Last edited by Tautaxe
Tuesday, October 20, 2020 | History

3 edition of The Gaelic names of plants (Scottish, Irish, and Manx) found in the catalog.

The Gaelic names of plants (Scottish, Irish, and Manx)

by John Cameron

  • 183 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published by J. Mackay in Glasgow .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Great Britain.
    • Subjects:
    • Plant names, Popular -- Goidelic.,
    • Botany -- Great Britain.,
    • Goidelic languages -- Glossaries, vocabularies, etc.

    • Edition Notes

      Other titlesScottish naturalist.
      Statementcollected and arranged in scientific order, with notes on their etymology, uses, plant superstitions, etc., among the Celts, with copious Gaelic, English, and scientific indices, by John Cameron.
      GenreGlossaries, vocabularies, etc.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsQK13 .C3 1900
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxv, 160 p.
      Number of Pages160
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL6612709M
      LC Control Number18023444
      OCLC/WorldCa3733334

      This is a list of giants and giantesses from mythology and folklore; it does not include giants from modern fantasy fiction or role-playing games (for those, see list of species in fantasy fiction). a b Frank Brinkley, Dairoku Kikuchi (). A History of the Japanese People: From .   The Gaelic name for Comfrey means "the plant for broken bones," and is used as a poultice today for treating sprains, sprains, bruises and swellings. Until recently it was used by families in the Aran Islands, Kerry, Limerick and other parts of the country as a poultice for healing broken bones, knowledge which has probably been passed up.

      Historically and in folklore, the respect given to trees varies in different parts of the Celtic world. On the Isle of Man, the phrase 'fairy tree' often refers to the elder tree. The medieval Welsh poem Cad Goddeu (The Battle of the Trees) is believed to contain Celtic tree lore, possibly relating to the crann ogham. • Gaelic names of beasts (Mammalia), birds, fishes, insects, reptiles, etc by Alexander Robert Forbes () • Gaelic names of plants (Scottish, Irish and Manx) with notes on their etymology, their uses, plant superstitions by John Cameron ().

      Get this from a library! Gaelic names of plants (Scottish and Irish): collected and arranged in scientific order, with notes on their etymology, their uses, plant superstitions, etc., among the Celts, with copious Gaelic, English, and scientific names. [John Cameron, of Sunderland.]. The complete list of taxon names from the BSBI’s database, includes many synonyms and alien taxa.. The BSBI’s short list of accepted plant names (Excel format) – last revised The latest official list of conservation statuses for all UK plants. GB Red List for vascular plants, revised Feb or the previous GB Red List version (with changes up to ).


Share this book
You might also like
Tanks of World War I: British and German

Tanks of World War I: British and German

[Discussions and proceedings]

[Discussions and proceedings]

trial of John Donellan, Esq., for the wilful murder of Sir Theodosius Edward Allesley Boughton, Bart.

trial of John Donellan, Esq., for the wilful murder of Sir Theodosius Edward Allesley Boughton, Bart.

Complete Space & Astronomy

Complete Space & Astronomy

outline of college algebra

outline of college algebra

Gypsona technique

Gypsona technique

Modern childhood?

Modern childhood?

Give war a chance

Give war a chance

Townshend heritage

Townshend heritage

Polsinney Harbour

Polsinney Harbour

Making the difference

Making the difference

Shark hunter

Shark hunter

Army Special Forces

Army Special Forces

Laws of the General Assembly of the Delaware state

Laws of the General Assembly of the Delaware state

The Gaelic names of plants (Scottish, Irish, and Manx) by John Cameron Download PDF EPUB FB2

This is a fascinating book, a wonderful collection of plant names in the gaelic, with regional variations for some. A must to have on the bookshelf beside Dwelly's dictionary and the type isn't so small!/5(3).

The Gaelic Names of Plants (Scottish, Irish, and Manx): Collected and Arranged in Scientific Order, With Notes on Their Etymology, Uses, Plant and Scientific Indices (Classic Reprint) [John Cameron] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Gaelic Names Of Plants (scottish The Gaelic names of plants book Irish): Collected And Arranged In Scientific Order, With Notes On Their Etymology Copious Gaelic, English, And Scientific Names: Cameron, John of Sunderland: : Books2/5(1).

Gaelic Names Of Plants: Scottish And Irish () Paperback – Septem Author: John Cameron. the gaelic names of plants (scottish, irish and manx). by John. Cameron (Author)/5(2). The Gaelic names of plants (Scottish, Irish, and Manx), collected and arranged in scientific order, with notes on their etymology, uses, plant superstitions, etc., among the Celts, with copious Gaelic, English, and scientific indices.

The metadata below describe the original : The Gaelic names of plants (Scottish, Irish, and Manx), collected and arranged in scientific order, with notes on their etymology, uses, plant superstitions, etc., among the Celts, with copious Gaelic, English, and scientific indices.

In Gaelic Irish, dandelion is called lus Bhríd (Brigid’s plant) or Bearnán Bríd (indented one of Brigid) where “lus” is the Irish equivalent of the English “wort,” or “plant.” [1] To this day, dandelion roots and leaves are used widely in teas, and the leaves.

There are some differences in the names of plants and people, and in dates, between Outlander (published in the USA) and Cross Stitch (published in the UK). Both versions will be listed with the words 'Outlander only' or 'Cross Stitch only' next to them.

If the name is the same in both books it will just say 'Outlander' next to it. 16 rows  This list of Scottish Gaelic given names shows Scottish Gaelic given names beside their. Try the new Google Books. Check out the new look and enjoy easier access to your favorite features. Try it now. No thanks.

Try the new Google Books Get print book. No eBook available Gaelic names of plants: ainmean Gaidhlig lusan. Joan W. Clark.- pages. 0 Reviews. What people are saying - Write a review. Gaelic names of plants (Scottish and Irish) Collected and arranged in scientific order, with notes on their etymology, their uses, plant superstitions, etc., among the Celts, with copious Gaelic, English and scientific indices by Cameron, John, of SunderlandPages: Full text of "The Gaelic names of plants (Scottish, Irish, and Manx), collected and arranged in scientific order, with notes on their etymology, uses, plant superstitions, etc., among the Celts, with copious Gaelic, English, and scientific indices" See other formats.

Gaelic names of plants (Scottish, Irish, and Manx) Description: Collected and arranged in scientific order, with notes on their etymology, their uses, plant superstitions, etc., among the Celts, with copious Gaelic, English, and scientific names / by John Cameron.

"Reprinted from a series of articles in the 'Scottish naturalist.'" Shelfmark. GAELIC PLANT NAMES. STUDY OF THEIR USES AND LORE I—ROOTS AND STEMS. This paper is not meant to be an exhaustive treatment of the flora of the Highlands, but a study of the outstanding plants and trees known to the Gael for their several virtues—dietetic, medical, and magical.

Gaelic names of plants (Scottish and Irish): collected and arranged in scientific order, with notes on their etymology, their uses, plant superstitions, etc., among the Celts, with copious Gaelic, English, and scientific names / By.

Cameron, John, of Sunderland. Type. Book. Sassenach - the literal meaning of the word is 'Saxon' and it is used to refer to an English person, not usually in a complimentary way Seamus, mac an fhear dhuibh - James, son of the Black One.

This is the name Jamie is given by the men in Ardsmuir prison but it becomes shortened to Mac Dubh (V, chapter 8) Seas - stop Sgian Dhu - small single-edged knife used for similar purposes to a modern. Gaelic names of plants (Scottish and Irish): collected and arranged in scientific order, with notes on their etymology, their uses, plant superstitions, etc., among the Celts, with copious Gaelic, English, and scientific names by Cameron, John, of SunderlandPages:   Crann Bethadh, the Celtic Tree of Life, is much more than a single trunk borne of roots below and stretching to the heavens with branches above; it is the Celtic symbol of all of life on the planet, born of the earth and sustained by the power of the Universe.

It is one of the most prominent symbols widely used on ancient Celtic designs. The Celtic deities are known from a variety of sources such as written Celtic mythology, ancient places of worship, statues, engravings, religious objects, as well as place and personal names.

Celtic deities can belong to two categories: general deities and local deities. "General deities" were known by the Celts throughout large regions, and are the gods and goddesses called upon for. Buy Gaelic Names of Plants by Cameron, John (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders. Gaelic Names of Plants: : Cameron, John: Books5/5(2).Buy The Gaelic Names Of Plants (scottish, irish and manx). By John Cameron, in Good condition. Our cheap used books come with free delivery. ISBN:Price: $Gaelic Names of Plants by John Cameron,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.